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Osteopath Vancouver WA

Local resource for osteopaths in Vancouver. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to alternative medicines, chiropractors, holistic medicine, naturopaths, complementary medicine and massage therapy, as well as advice and content on osteopathy.

Chandler, Peter, Md - Healthy Steps Women's Ctr
(360) 514-7300
6100 NE Fourth Plain Blvd
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Ashbrook Medical-Family Practice
(360) 892-2030
5512 NE 107th Ave
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Clayton Theresa L Md
(360) 696-4691
3200 Main St
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Brar M Md
(360) 695-5754
3100 Main St
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Koscinska Maria Anna Md
(360) 695-1334
100 E 33rd St Ste 206
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Mecouch George Do General Psychiatry
(360) 699-0996
1007 Officers Row
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO), Psychologist

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Kubiniec Richard Md Ps
(360) 892-0208
11801 NE 65th St
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Bruhn Kathleen
(360) 253-6425
7600 NE 41st St Ste 310
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO), Psychologist

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Hope Medical Holistic Clinic
(360) 750-9292
3606 Main St
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Domash Michael Md
(360) 906-7156
2215 Broadway St
Vancouver, WA
Industry
Osteopath (DO)

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Osteopathy: Development of Osteopathy to the Present Day

 (Excerpted from Osteopathy: A Complete Health Care System )

From its small beginnings in the last years of the nineteenth century to the present time there has been a dynamic growth in osteopathy in all its spheres—education, research and practice. In the U.S.A there are in the region of 20,000 fully licensed osteopathic physicians currently in practice. Their training is in all respects equal to that received by medical students in terms of content, standards and requirements.

The emphasis in the osteopathic colleges has, over the years, been towards producing osteopathic practitioners who could practice comprehensive medicine, using orthodox methods as well as the unique osteopathic approach. This has tended to result in a number of osteopathic physicians becoming indistinguishable from orthodox doctors, and many have found it easier to practice 'straight' medicine rather than to employ the methods uniquely associated with osteopathy.

As a result of this trend a group of practitioners dedicated to the preservation and dissemination of the essential fundamentals of osteopathy formed, in 1937, the Academy of Applied Osteopathy. This organization, through its efforts, has been responsible for a resurgence of interest amongst the new generations of practitioners in the methods and philosophy of the original osteopathic pioneers. The Year Books of the Academy provide a treasure-house of information and inspiration for the profession.

It should not be thought, though, that the osteopathic profession has been slavishly tied to the pronouncements of Dr Still. Indeed, as early as 1918, Dr Michael Lane D.O. wrote: 'Many osteopaths, while revering the founder of the new system, have seemed to feel that because Still was right in his grand principles of disease and its therapy, that therefore he should not have been wrong in anything he said about the body and its work in health and disease. But such osteopaths are short-sighted and unwise. If Dr Still had been right in all his theories he would not have not been human.'

In the U.K., where osteopathy has had a very different history from that in the U.S.A., writers and teachers have tried to hold on to the essentials of Still's teaching whilst also being aware of his shortcomings. In 1954 the eminent British osteopath, S. Webster-Jones, describing in a lecture the case of the child with dysentery who Still had treated, said: 'It would be only too easy to ridicule Still's approach to this case, and his idea of moving heat from one part of the body to another. Discredit Still's ideas on physiology, diet, medical diagnosis, as you will, actually they led him back to his patient as a whole, to seek in his body the cause of his illness and to try to remove it. They led him away from that overstudy of local pathology and preoccupation with local and systemic diseases that has led to over-specialization in orthodox medicine, which has had the effect that the patient is often forgotten...

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Osteopathy: What is Osteopathy?

 (Excerpted from Osteopathy: A Complete Health Care System )

If you have ever had an aching back, stiff neck, tennis elbow, 'gammy' knee or some such affliction of the body, then the chances are that you have sought the help of, or have been advised by someone to go to, an osteopath for relief. If, however, you have, or have had, a more serious health problem such as asthma, migraine headaches, angina pains, digestive disturbances (to name but a few examples), then it has probably not occurred to you that the condition might have some of its origins in a dysfunction of some mechanical component of the body, the musculo-skeletal system. You would, therefore, probably not have taken such a problem to an osteopath practitioner. Surprising as it may seem, many such 'illnesses' are often the end result of biomechanical changes in the structure of the body which are amenable to osteopathic treatment. This theme will be elaborated on in later chapters, and some of the fascinating research that has been done in a wide range of health problems will be detailed. At this stage, the idea of osteopathy offering help to conditions other than the more obvious aches and pains may seem a strange one. In order to understand the concept of osteopathy, and what its real potentials are, it is necessary to examine its roots and subsequent development.

Osteopathy is a system of health care which recognizes that the self-healing, self-regulating ability of the body is dependent upon a number of factors, including favourable environmental conditions (internal and external), adequate nutrition and normal structural integrity. It utilizes generally accepted methods of diagnosis, as well as certain specialised ones developed to facilitate accurate structural assessment. It places special emphasis upon the importance of body mechanics, and uses manipulative techniques to detect and correct, faulty structure and function.

In many people's minds, especially in the U.K., osteopathy is equated mainly with the treatment of spinal and other joint pains and problems. This limited care concept is largely an historical accident. As indicated above, the osteopathic profession sees itself as being relevant to a wide range of health problems, and not simply limited to the treatment of musculo-skeletal derangements. Since the turn of the century, when the first American-trained osteopaths established themselves in practice in the U.K., they have filled a gap that existed (and to a large extent still exists) in medical practice. Doctors tended to regard musculo-skeletal problems as relatively unimportant, and manipulation as, at best, an unknown quantity and, at worst, valueless.

Side view of a normal spine showing the natural curves.

In the U.S.A., the gradual evolution of osteopathy has been towards its original goal of providing a complete health-care system, dealing with all of man's ailments, and utilizing all those accepted therapeutic metho...

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